Tuesday, 09 July 2024 00:00

A broken foot or toe involves a fracture in the bones of the foot or toes, often caused by trauma such as falls, sports injuries, or heavy objects dropping on the foot. Symptoms can include immediate pain, swelling, bruising, and difficulty while walking or bearing weight. First aid for a broken foot or toe starts with immobilization to prevent further injury. Keep the foot elevated to reduce swelling, avoid putting weight on the injured foot, and use crutches, if necessary. Pain relievers can help manage pain and inflammation. Proper treatment is important as complications from untreated fractures can include chronic pain, improper healing, and arthritis. In severe cases, surgery might be required to realign the bones. If you have broken your foot or a toe, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist sooner, rather than later. This medical professional can provide appropriate treatment and rehabilitation plans to ensure proper healing.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Crosstown Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Wayne, Montclair, and Randolph, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 03 July 2024 00:00

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 02 July 2024 00:00

Diabetic limb salvage is a medical approach focused on preventing amputations in patients with diabetes. Diabetes can lead to poor circulation and nerve damage, particularly in the lower extremities, increasing the risk of severe infections and ulcers. Limb salvage involves a comprehensive treatment plan aimed at healing these ulcers, improving blood flow, and managing infections. This multidisciplinary approach includes wound care, surgical interventions, and lifestyle modifications to control blood sugar levels and enhance overall foot health. The goal is to preserve the patient's limbs, improve quality of life, and prevent the devastating impact of amputation. Timely intervention and continuous care are essential to the success of diabetic limb salvage, emphasizing the importance of regular medical check-ups and early treatment of any foot issues in diabetic patients. If you have diabetes, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can evaluate your condition, and educate you about methods that may help to avoid amputation.

Diabetic Limb Salvage

Diabetic limb salvage can be an effective way in preventing the need for limb amputation. If you have a foot ulcer and diabetes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Crosstown Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Diabetic Limb Salvage?

Diabetic limb salvage is the attempt of saving a limb, such as the foot, that has an infected ulcer, from amputation. Podiatrists also try to make sure that there is enough function in the foot after the salvage that it is still usable. Those with diabetes experience poor blood circulation, which prevents proper healing of an ulcer. If the ulcer is left uncheck, it could become infected, which could result in the need for amputation.

Diabetes is the number one cause of non-traumatic amputations in the United States. Amputation has been found to lead to higher mortality rates. This translates into higher healthcare costs, and a reduced quality of life and mobility for amputees. Podiatrists have attempted to increase the prevalence of limb salvage in an attempt to solve these issues.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Limb salvage teams have grown in recent years that utilize a number of different treatments to save the infected limb. This includes podiatrists that specialize in wound care, rehabilitation, orthotics, and surgery. Through a combination of these methods, limb salvage has been found to be an effective treatment for infected limbs, and as an alternative to amputation. Podiatrists will first evaluate the potential for limb salvage and determine if the limb can be saved or must be amputated. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Wayne, Montclair, and Randolph, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 25 June 2024 00:00

Clubfoot is a congenital condition where the baby’s foot is turned inward due to issues with bones and muscles. Treating clubfoot requires a multi-step treatment approach. Initially, the Ponseti method of serial casting is used to correct the foot's position. After achieving correction, the next vital step involves using a boots-and-bar orthosis. This device consists of two open-toed boots connected by a metal bar. It keeps the feet turned outward to maintain the corrected position. A podiatrist will fit your child with this device, ensuring that the boots fit snugly and the foot remains secure inside. For the first three months, your child will need to wear the device for 23 hours a day, gradually reducing to nighttime use after periodic evaluation by the podiatrist. It is important to consistently use the orthosis until your child is four to five years old to prevent the foot from reverting to its clubfoot position. Adherence to wearing the orthosis is key to successful long-term results. To ensure the best treatment for your child's clubfoot, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for a treatment plan.

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Crosstown Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Wayne, Montclair, and Randolph, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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